People

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Adrien Abecassis

Adrien Abecassis is a French career diplomat, a Fellow at UCLA Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and at HKS’ Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government and a Director of Research at the Paris Peace Forum, developing a structured international dialogue on governance needs for solar geoengineering. He previously served as a European Advisor and as a Senior Political Advisor to the President of France, after serving in various position at the Foreign Service. Adrien graduated in International Law and Public Administration from the University of Paris Sorbonne and from Sciences-Po Paris. He was a Fellow with the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs from 2017 to 2020 and with the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs in 2019-2020.

Lizzie Burns

Lizzie Burns

Managing Director, Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program

Lizzie is the Managing Director of Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program, which aims to advance natural and social science research on solar geoengineering. Prior to Harvard, Lizzie worked for the non-profit advocacy organization Opportunity Nation. She also staffed a U.S. Senate campaign and served as an intern at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. Lizzie graduated from Williams College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and from the Harvard Kennedy School with a Master in Public Policy.

John Dykema

John Dykema

Project Scientist, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

John Dykema is a Project Scientist in the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He focuses on the development of instrumentation (particularly infrared remote sensing systems) and validation of long-term data records for atmospheric model testing applications. From this perspective, quantitatively testing model performance in simulating geoengineering impacts provides a new set of observational challenges. Recent work has assessed the measurement requirements necessary to empirically quantify the risk of ozone loss posed by geoengineering through improved understanding of stratospheric chemistry and dynamics. He holds a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Harvard University.

Sebastian Eastham

Sebastian Eastham

Visiting Scientist, Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program

Sebastian is a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Aviation and the Environment (LAE). His previous work has covered development and application of global atmospheric chemistry and transport models, ranging from his work to implement stratospheric chemistry in the GEOS-Chem community atmospheric model, through to his recent paper discussing the possible health effects of solar geoengineering. He is currently working as a visiting scientist for the Harvard Solar Geoengineering Research Program, investigating the behavior of aircraft plumes in the stratosphere - including those which would be expected to form if stratospheric aerosol injection were ever deployed.

Colleen Golja

Colleen Golja

PhD Student, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Colleen is a PhD student at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Before coming to Harvard, she earned her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Tufts University, with research experience pertaining to polymer membranes and electrolysis applications. She is interested in climate issues, and is currently looking at the radiative forcing of a variety of aerosols to gain insight into potential materials for use in geoengineering.

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Tony Harding

Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School

Anthony (Tony) Harding is a postdoctoral fellow researching the intersection of innovative technologies and climate policy. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Georgia Institute of Technology, where his research focused on climate and energy economics, and earned a BS from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Math and Physics. His research applies both econometrics and economic modelling to evaluate climate policy and climate impacts. Tony’s most recent work estimates the distribution of economic impacts of solar geoengineering across countries and compares it to the impacts of climate change. His current interests include the design of effective international climate governance structures and the measurement of the value of scientific learning.

Joshua Horton

Joshua Horton

Research Director, Geoengineering

Josh Horton is Research Director, Geoengineering. Josh conducts research on geoengineering policy and governance issues, including the regulation of research, liability and compensation, and geopolitics. Josh previously worked as a clean energy consultant for a global energy consulting firm. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from Johns Hopkins University.

David Keith

David Keith

Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

David Keith has worked near the interface between climate science, energy technology, and public policy for twenty-five years. He took first prize in Canada's national physics prize exam, won MIT's prize for excellence in experimental physics, and was one of TIME magazine's Heroes of the Environment. David is Professor of Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and founder of Carbon Engineering, a company developing technology to capture CO2 from ambient air to make carbon-neutral hydrocarbon fuels.... Read more about David Keith

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Joel Krupa

Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science

Joel is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. His research assesses the challenges and opportunities facing environmental NGOs in solar geoengineering governance. Prior to joining The Keith Group, Joel taught several undergraduate classes, published numerous academic articles relating to energy and the environment, and undertook visiting research appointments at research centres affiliated with Imperial College London and the University of Oxford. He completed his PhD at the University of Toronto in 2019 after studying at the University of Oxford, the University of London (London School of Economics), and the University of British Columbia.

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Ansar Lemon

PhD Student, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Ansar is a PhD Student at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He is interested in all aspects of climate change related research, from clean energy technology to geoengineering techniques. Previously, Ansar worked at Xallent, a tech startup focused on nanoscale microscopy; at MIT, to develop a web-based user interface for GenX, a capacity expansion modelling software for power system planning; and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to model charging patterns for battery electric vehicles and develop a graphics package for analyzing power systems data. Ansar grew up in Kansas City, Missouri and earned his B.S. in Engineering Physics from Cornell University.

Ben Schafer

Ben Schafer

PhD Student, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Ben is a PhD student at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He is broadly interested in experimental physics and chemistry and how they can be used to tackle issues surrounding climate change. Ben earned his B.A. in physics and chemistry at Hamilton College and subsequently conducted physical chemistry research at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

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Jake Seeley

Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science

Jake is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. His work on solar geoengineering in the Keith group focuses on using simple climate models to assess the effects of spectrally and meridionally tuning geoengineering interventions. Previously, Jake worked on a variety of radiative-convective phenomena, including the physics of carbon dioxide radiative forcing, anvil cloud formation, and the effect of global warming on lightning and severe thunderstorms; currently, Jake is pursuing these interests with Associate Professor Robin Wordsworth by studying moist convection in very warm climates, such as will be found on Earth in approximately 1 billion years when the sun is about 10% brighter. He received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 2018. 

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Hongwei Sun

PhD Student, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Hongwei is a PhD student at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He currently works on solar geoengineering research. He is broadly interested in climate research and numerical modeling. In the past, he has studied the climatic impacts of wind farms using numerical models. Prior to Harvard, Hongwei earned an M.S. from Tsinghua University in Atmospheric Sciences, and B.S./B.A. from Sun Yat-Sen University in Atmospheric Sciences.

Selena Wallace

Selena Wallace

Environmental Research Coordinator
Selena is the Coordinator for Environmental Research at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. She supports work in The Keith Group and Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program. Prior to Harvard, she served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Philippines working on coastal resource management projects, focusing on mangrove habitat restoration and fisheries management. Selena graduated from Northeastern University with a B.A. in Environmental Studies and International Affairs.