People

Lizzie Burns

Lizzie Burns

Fellow, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Program Director, Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program

Lizzie is a Fellow at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Program Director of Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program. Prior to Harvard, Lizzie worked for the non-profit advocacy organization Opportunity Nation. She also staffed a U.S. Senate campaign and served as an intern at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. Lizzie graduated from Williams College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and from the Harvard Kennedy School with a Master in Public Policy.

Zhen Dai

Zhen Dai

PhD Student, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Zhen is a PhD student at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. She currently works on the experimental study of aerosol particle reactivity for geoengineering. She is broadly interested in climate and environmental issues. In the past she has managed clean water projects in Haiti and China. Prior to Harvard, Zhen earned an M.S. from UIUC in electrical engineering, and B.S./B.A. from Cornell University in Materials Science & Engineering and Chemistry.

John Dykema

John Dykema

Project Scientist, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

John Dykema is a Project Scientist in the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He focuses on the development of instrumentation (particularly infrared remote sensing systems) and validation of long-term data records for atmospheric model testing applications. From this perspective, quantitatively testing model performance in simulating geoengineering impacts provides a new set of observational challenges. Recent work has assessed the measurement requirements necessary to empirically quantify the risk of ozone loss posed by geoengineering through improved understanding of stratospheric chemistry and dynamics. He holds a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Harvard University.

Colleen Golja

Colleen Golja

PhD Student, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Colleen is a PhD student at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Before coming to Harvard, she earned her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Tufts University, with research experience pertaining to polymer membranes and electrolysis applications. She is interested in climate issues, and is currently looking at the radiative forcing of a variety of aerosols to gain insight into potential materials for use in geoengineering.

Joshua Horton

Joshua Horton

Research Director, Geoengineering

Josh Horton is Research Director, Geoengineering. Josh conducts research on geoengineering policy and governance issues, including the regulation of research, liability and compensation, and geopolitics. Josh previously worked as a clean energy consultant for a global energy consulting firm. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from Johns Hopkins University.

Pete Irvine

Pete Irvine

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Pete Irvine is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Pete conducts research on the climate and broader impacts of solar geoengineering and works to put those findings into perspective with the risks posed by climate change. He works with researchers from a range of disciplines to explore the implications of solar geoengineering as a potential means of reducing the risks of climate change. Current work includes evaluating the potential effectiveness of different solar geoengineering proposals at reducing sea-level rise to determine whether solar geoengineering deployment could be optimized to increase this effectiveness.

David Keith

David Keith

Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

David Keith has worked near the interface between climate science, energy technology, and public policy for twenty-five years. He took first prize in Canada's national physics prize exam, won MIT's prize for excellence in experimental physics, and was one of TIME magazine's Heroes of the Environment. David is Professor of Applied Physics in Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Professor of Public Policy in the Harvard Kennedy School, and founder at Carbon Engineering, a company developing technology to capture of CO2 from ambient air to make carbon-neutral hydrocarbon fuels. … Read more about David Keith

Lee Miller

Lee Miller

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Lee Miller is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He is presently focused on understanding large-scale wind power, coupling its ability to generate electricity with the associated climate differences such large-scale wind farms may also introduce. Lee previously spent seven years as a junior/senior research scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Lab, as well as seven years as a PhD/Postdoc at the Max Planck Institute.

Daniel Thorpe

Daniel Thorpe

Research Fellow, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Daniel is a graduate student working in engineering and public policy. He is broadly interested in efficient, appropriate mitigation of climate change and rapid decarbonization of the world's energy supply. Specific interests at the moment include the possible expansion of nuclear power and highly complex but potentially low-cost mitigation efforts like climate-aware urban planning in new cities and developments, and transnational emissions reductions schemes like the CDM.… Read more about Daniel Thorpe

Gernot Wagner

Gernot Wagner

Executive Director, Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program
Research Associate, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Lecturer on Environmental Science and Public Policy, Harvard University

Gernot Wagner is the executive director of Harvard’s Solar Geoengineering Research Program, a research associate at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, a lecturer on Environmental Science and Public Policy, and an associate at the Harvard University Center for the Environment.

He wrote Climate Shock, joint with Harvard’s Martin Weitzman and published by Princeton University Press (2015), a Top 15 Financial Times McKinsey Business Book of 2015, now also Austria’s Natural Science Book of the Year 2017; and But will the planet notice? (Hill & Wang/Farrar Strauss & Giroux, 2011).

Gernot served as economist at the Environment Defense Fund (2008 – 2016), most recently as lead senior economist (2014 – 2016) and member of its Leadership Council (2015 – 2016). He taught energy economics as adjunct associate professor at Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs (2011 – 2015) and at NYU Stern School of Business (2016).

Debra Weisenstein

Debra Weisenstein

Senior Researcher, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Debra Weisenstein is a senior researcher in the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Her work focuses on modeling stratospheric chemistry and aerosol microphysics with application to solar geoengineering. She developed the AER 2-D chemisry-transport-aerosol model which has been applied to studies of atmospheric sulfur, volcanic eruptions, and aircraft impacts on the atmosphere, as well as to geoengineering by injection of SO2 and H2SO4. Recent work focuses on modeling solid particles with fractal structure for possible geoengineering application. She collaborates with Prof. Thomas Peter at ETH in Zurich and was a lead author of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties report, published in 2006 by the World Climate Research Program.